EFL CLASSROOM 2.0

See on Scoop.itICT hints and tips for the Argentinian EFL classroom

English Language Learning and Teaching. ESL, EFL, TEFL, TESOL, and students.

See on community.eflclassroom.com

Anuncios

Flipped Classroom: Beyond the Videos

See on Scoop.itListado de herramientas de autor y aplicaciones web gratuitas

Last week, I read an interesting blog post by Shelley Blake-Plock titled “The Problem with TED ed.” It got me thinking about the flipped classroom model and how it is being defined.

 

 

Flipped Classroom: Beyond the Videos Posted on April 30, 2012 by Catlin  

 

Last week, I read an interesting blog post by Shelley Blake-Plock titled ”The Problem with TED ed.” It got me thinking about the flipped classroom model and how it is being defined.

As a blended learning enthusiast, I have played with the flipped classroom model, seen presentations by inspiring educators who flip their classrooms, and even have a chapter dedicated to this topic in my book. However, I am disheartened to hear so many people describe the flipped classroom as a model where teachers must record videos or podcasts for students to view at home. 

There are many teachers who do not want to record videos either because they don’t have the necessary skills or equipment, their classes don’t include a lot of lecture that can be captured in recordings, or they are camera shy.

Too often the conversation surrounding the flipped classroom focuses on the videos- creating them, hosting them, and assessing student understanding of the content via simple questions or summary assignments.

I wish the conversation focused more on what actually happens in a flipped classroom. If we move lecture or the transfer of knowledge online to create time and space in the physical classroom, how are we using that time to improve learning for students? What is our role as the teacher in the flipped classroom? How are we maximizing the potential of the group when students are together to design collaborative, creative, student-centered activities and assignments? This is the part I want to hear more about!

For me, the beauty of the flipped classroom lies in the simple realization that instruction can take place in different mediums. We are no longer limited to a class period or a physical classroom. We have the opportunity to match the instructional activity with the environment that makes the most sense. Ramsey Musallam, defines “flip teaching” as “leveraging technology to appropriately pair the learning activity with the learning environment.” This flexibility is why technology has the potential to be so transformative in education.

The goal of the flipped classroom should be to shift lessons from “consumables” to “produceables.” (Okay, I realize I just made that word up, but I hope my meaning is clear.) Students today must be generators and producers. They must be able to question, problem solve, think outside of the box, and create innovative solutions to be competitive and successful in our rapidly changing global economy.

Blake-Plock makes a strong point when he says we learn by “doing.” He points out that many of the lessons students are given are “consumables” and this is my concern about the current language being used to describe the flipped classroom. Too often the flipped classroom requires students to watch videos, which is passive learning, but what are they asked to do with this information?

 Often the homework described in the flipped classroom model only engages the lower level thinking skills described in Bloom’s Taxonomy – remembering and understanding. The application, analysis, evaluation and creation are rarely engaged at home. There is an opportunity to get students thinking at a higher level at home if we pair content with extension activities that require that they think critically about what they have viewed. The important element is to connect students online outside of class so they have a support network of peers to ask questions, bounce ideas around with and learn from. This is why I am such a big supporter of integrating online discussions into the traditional curriculum. 

 In my presentations on the flipped classroom, I’ve advocated for 3 things that I think would make this model more appealing to most of educators:

 1. Take advantage of the ready-to-use content available. There is so much ready-to-use content on the web that teachers shouldn’t feel pressure produce videos (unless they want to or it works for their subject area). Let’s use what is out there and save time when we can.

I hate to limit the potential of the flipped model by telling teachers they have to record their own video lectures. Instead, I encourage teachers to flip all kinds of ready-to-use media.

History.com PBS.org NationalGeographic.com KhanAcademy.org 

These are sites are great resources for media ranging from documentaries, interviews, demonstrations, tutorials, primary/secondary sources, articles, biographies, photography, graphs, artwork, etc.

 If you are wondering…can I really flip my class with photos or images? I say yes. If students have time to really sit and appreciate the nuances of an image or graph and think deeply about the details, they will get much more from that then if it is projected for 3 minutes as a teacher talks. There is not time in class for students to control the pace of their learning. This is a clear advantage of moving information that needs to be “consumed” online.

For example, consider the example below that presents a painting, then asks students to analyze the different aspects of the painting to select the art movement they think it was produced during. Students have time to evaluate the various elements of the painting then articulate an explanation supporting their position. They also benefit from reading what their peers have said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*This topic is available in the Collaborize Classroom topic library, click here to view. 

2. Don’t just show them. Make them do something with that information that requires higher- order thinking. I encourage teachers to wrap the content presented at home in dynamic online discussions, debates, and/or collaborative group work. This way students must think critically about the content, engage with their peers, and produce something (an argument, a clear analytical explanation, formulate questions, synthesize information from multiple sources, etc.).

I agree with Blake-Plock’s assertion that ”It is perfectly fine to watch a video. It is perfectly fine to view a lecture. It is perfectly fine to quiz yourself on what you remember from the video or the lecture. It is perfectly fine to write a brief response about a big question. But let’s not call that a lesson. That’s just a starting point. Lessons come from doing.”  So why not pair the content with an activity that gets them “doing” then imagine where you could start the actual class activity?

For example, consider the debate question below. Students are asked to view a Khan Academy tutorial then debate whether or not they think Napoleon could have successfully won the Peninsular Campaign. This forces students to think critically about what they have watched, articulate a position and support that position with information and analysis.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*This topic is available in the Collaborize Classroom topic library, click here to view. 

3. Use the flipped model to create a student-centered classroom. Focus class time on getting students practicing where there is a subject area expert in the room. Get students actively engaging in the learning process. Do more:

labs, experiments, and fieldwork creative writing assignments  collaborative research projects acting, dramatic readings, tableaus project based learning art work reenactments  debates  model construction

 

By Jens Rötzsch (Jens Rötzsch) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)

The class period has the potential to shift from a space where students are passive observers and consumers in the learning process to a space where they’re actively engaged in a dynamic learning community.

 

I’d love for other educators to share the innovative things they are doing inside their flipped classrooms! How are you using your class time to build on content presented at home?

 

See on catlintucker.com

¿Qué es e-Learning? ¿Cuáles son los beneficios? ¿Quienes son los Asesores e-Learning? ¿Cómo se elabora un curso virtual? ¿Qué son los estándares? ¿Qué es la norma SCORM? – Todas las respuestas en u…

See on Scoop.itListado de herramientas de autor y aplicaciones web gratuitas

¿Qué es e-Learning? ¿Cuáles son los beneficios? ¿Quienes son los Asesores e-Learning? ¿Cómo se elabora un curso virtual? ¿Qué son los estándares? ¿Qué es la norma SCORM? – Todas las respuestas en un único video.

 

 

See on www.youtube.com

Libros electrónicos: pros y contras

Cómo Internet está cambiando la forma en que funciona el cerebro humano

See on Scoop.itListado de herramientas de autor y aplicaciones web gratuitas

Fuente: http://ionaformacionvirtual.ning.com/profiles/blog/show?id=6365062%3ABlogPost%3A127037&xgs=1&xg_source=msg_share_post

• Publicado por Congreso TIC el mayo 5, 2012 a las 4:30pm

 

La Nación entrevistó a científicos de la Argentina, Estados Unidos e Inglaterra para determinar si es cierto, como se ha afirmado durante años, que las nuevas tecnologías afectan nuestras funciones intelectuales, y cómo lo hacen. La respuesta es asombrosa
Por Débora Slotnisky |

 

Según la teoría de la evolución, el hombre está en constante cambio. Aunque muchas veces sea imperceptible, las modificaciones se van dando en función del entorno.
Con la masificación de Internet, las redes sociales, la telefonía celular, la cotidianidad se ha visto radicalmente modificada durante los últimos años. Por ejemplo, antes recordábamos con facilidad muchísimos números telefónicos, y ahora no es disparatado encontrar hasta nuestro propio número agendado en nuestro celular.

El Prof. Dr. Ricardo Allegri, jefe de Neurología Cognitiva de Fleni e investigador independiente del Conicet, explica este fenómeno: “Las nuevas tecnologías cambian paradigmas. De esta manera, las formas de procesamiento que eran habituales en generaciones anteriores se alteran; es decir, si en el pasado el procesamiento de la información era más lineal, actualmente es en paralelo, por eso una persona puede mantener al mismo tiempo varias conversaciones a través de Twitter, SMS y chat, sin inconvenientes”.

Plástico como el cerebro

“La ortografía y escritura también se están alterando, y esto se evidencia a simple vista cuando se observa cómo escriben los más jóvenes. Esto no quiere decir que estén mermando las capacidades lingüísticas, simplemente hay un cambio comparado con el pasado”, ejemplifica la Dra. Alba Richaudeau, neuropsicóloga del Hospital Austral y del Instituto Argentino de Psicología Aplicada (Iapsa).

Por su parte, la Dra. Tracy Alloway, experta en psicología cognitiva de la Universidad de Stirling, en Escocia, realizó un estudio para analizar el impacto de las aplicaciones tecnológicas en la memoria del trabajo , es decir, los procesos cerebrales involucrados en retener información durante un período corto y cómo manipulamos esta información. Esta memoria, además de almacenar los recuerdos, nos ayuda a utilizarlos para relacionar datos y resolver problemas.

Dra. Alba Richaudeau, neuropsicóloga del Hospital Austral y el Instituto Argentino de Psicología Aplicada (Iapsa). Foto: LA NACION / Hernán Zenteno

“Los cerebros de los niños, por su relación con las nuevas tecnologías y por la evolución propia del hombre, tienen diferencias respecto de los cerebros de las generaciones anteriores, por eso es indispensable cambiar el sistema educativo, que está prácticamente obsoleto. Nosotros aprendimos acumulando datos y lo valioso era saber muchas cosas. Sin embargo, hoy los datos están accesibles todo el tiempo, de modo tal que ya no es un valor para el cerebro el acumular información”, sostiene la Dra. Alba Richaudeau, neuropsicóloga del Hospital Austral y el Instituto Argentino de Psicología Aplicada (Iapsa).

A tal fin, Alloway reunió a 104 estudiantes universitarios y a 284 adultos, de entre 18 y 30 años. A esos dos grupos los dividió en dos equipos. Por un lado, los que llevaban más de 12 meses usando Facebook y por el otro, los que contaban con menos tiempo en esa red social. Se sometió a todos los participantes a distintas pruebas vinculadas con la memoria y el lenguaje. Los resultados obtenidos indican que los del primer grupo tuvieron una mayor puntuación en todas las pruebas en comparación con los del segundo.

 

“De esta manera pudimos observar que el acto de comprobar el estado de un amigo y sus actualizaciones en Facebook fue un importante predictor del coeficiente intelectual verbal. Esto es así porque cuando una persona está usando Facebook tiene que tener en cuenta la nueva información de su amigo (es decir, el estado de actualización) y descartar el conocimiento previo acerca de dicho individuo. De esta manera es posible que usar Facebook sirva para aumentar las capacidades cognitivas como la memoria de trabajo y el coeficiente intelectual verbal”, dijo en diálogo con La Nacion.

Además, Alloway está analizando el impacto de aplicaciones populares como YouTube y Twitter en la memoria de trabajo. Según los primeros resultados del estudio, tales aplicaciones estarían disminuyendo dicha habilidad: “Mis conclusiones indican que estas herramientas podrían estar perjudicando las capacidades del ser humano, que existe la posibilidad de que este tipo de tecnología pueda dañar nuestra memoria de trabajo ya que nos insta a realizar actividades muy breves y cortas. Con Twitter, que se basa en mensajes de 140 caracteres, utilizamos muy poca información en cada mensaje. De esta manera no estamos usando la memoria ni la capacidad del lenguaje tal como lo hacíamos en el pasado, y lo mismo sucede con el uso de los mensajes de texto. Por otro lado, cuando una persona está usando Facebook tiene que tener en cuenta la nueva información de su amigo (que sería el estado de actualización), y descartar el conocimiento previo acerca de dicha persona. De esta manera es posible que el acto de usar Facebook sirva para aumentar las capacidades cognitivas como la memoria de trabajo y el coeficiente intelectual verbal”, sostiene.

Dra. Marcela Cohen, neuróloga de la Clínica y Maternidad Suizo Argentina. Foto: LA NACION / Ignacio Colo

Con respecto a estas conclusiones, el médico de Fleni advierte: “Si uno evalúa las funciones cognitivas en forma aislada, puede decir que el impacto es positivo o negativo. Por ejemplo, si analizo el efecto de los buscadores de Internet puedo afirmar que alteran de alguna manera nuestro cerebro, ya que la memoria episódica (que es un sistema de memoria explícita y declarativa que se utiliza para recordar experiencias personales enmarcadas en nuestro propio contexto, como es el hecho de recordar números de teléfonos) se vuelve menos efectiva que antes, pero si lo analizo en el nivel global, sin duda se trata de un impacto positivo, porque rescato que las redes sociales como Facebook nos facilitan la memoria operativa porque nos permite interrelacionar situaciones, mientras que Twitter, por sus características de instantaneidad y linealidad, pone al cerebro en contacto con infinidad de personas que discuten una misma información”.

En este sentido, una investigación publicada en la revista Science a mediados de 2011 sugiere que cuando las personas confían en tener acceso futuro a la información tienen menor recuerdo de los datos, pero mayor de la fuente de esa información. Este estudio asegura que Internet se ha convertido en la fuente primaria de memoria externa. Al respecto, el experto de Fleni opina: “Estamos ante un problema si la actividad que antes tenía el cerebro ahora se la delegamos a los aparatos, dejando al órgano inactivo. Pero si descargo parte de mi memoria en Internet para poder usar mis capacidades para interactuar y procesar diversas informaciones, entonces el efecto es positivo. Antes teníamos una capacidad mucho más limitada para ubicar y manejar información. Ahora tenemos más acceso y mayor capacidad para procesar y relacionar mucha información. Definitivamente, no es que el cerebro deja de trabajar, sino que lo hace de otra manera”.

El Efecto Google

Los motores de búsqueda tienen un impacto fundamental en el funcionamiento de nuestro cerebro. Los expertos denominan Efecto Google al fenómeno por el cual la población ha comenzado a utilizar Internet como su banco de datos. De esta manera, las computadoras y los buscadores se han convertido en una especie de sistema de memoria externa al que puede accederse a voluntad del usuario y al que la memoria humana se está adaptando.

“Este alejamiento de la memorización en última instancia puede ayudar a la gente a mejorar su comprensión, porque la memoria es mucho más que la memorización, y el Efecto Google nos permite liberar más espacio en nuestros cerebros para orientarlo más al procesamiento de información”, asegura Alloway.

Prof. Dr. Ricardo Allegri, jefe de Neurología Cognitiva de Fleni e investigador independiente del Conicet. Foto: LA NACION / Diego Spivacow/AFV
“Cuando usamos el GPS dejamos de estimular nuestro cerebro para crear una estrategia para desplazarnos de un punto a otro”. , subraya la Dra. Marcela Cohen, neuróloga de la Clínica y Maternidad Suizo Argentina.

“Está claro que hoy, el Efecto Google es la forma actual de acopio de datos. Si bien puede verse como detrimento para el ejercicio de la memoria, desarrolla otras áreas como la creatividad y asociación rápida, y la posibilidad de realizar lecturas simultáneas. El acceso instantáneo a la información variada permite la comparación, la asociación de ideas, y estimula la flexibilidad cognitiva mediante la utilización de juegos y programas informáticos. El cerebro tiene muchas funciones, una es la memoria. Si bien ésta es la que parece descansar en el nuevo escenario, otras como la rapidez visual y motora, la deducción, la concentración y la atención utilizadas en Internet son propiciadas como una forma de gimnasia cerebral”, destaca la Dra. Marcela Cohen.
Mentalmente social

Casi el 40% de los argentinos tiene una cuenta en Facebook, según un reciente estudio de la consultora eMarketer, que vaticina que para 2014 existirán 17 millones de personas registradas en esta red social. Con estos datos, el país se coloca como el tercero a nivel mundial con mayor penetración y como líder en América latina.
“Hay evidencia de que los individuos que están más conectados socialmente pueden retrasar la pérdida de memoria en la edad avanzada”, dice Alloway, y explica que, por ejemplo con el uso de Facebook, la memoria de trabajo puede ser estimulada y mejorada a cualquier edad, obteniendo un impacto enorme en las capacidades cognitivas y de aprendizaje.

“Las nuevas tecnologías cambian paradigmas. De esta manera, las formas de procesamiento que eran habituales en generaciones anteriores empiezan a cambiar, es decir, si en el pasado el procesamiento de la información era más lineal, hoy el cerebro trabaja de otra manera, por eso las conversaciones hoy no son lineales, sino que se dan en paralelo, motivo por el cual una persona puede mantener al mismo tiempo varias conversaciones diferentes a través de Twitter, SMS y chat, sin inconvenientes”, advierte el Prof. Dr. Ricardo Allegri, jefe de Neurología Cognitiva de Fleni e investigador independiente del Conicet.
Tracy Alloway, experta en Psicología Cognitiva de la Universidad de Stirling, en Escocia.

El investigador Ryota Kanai, del Instituto de Neurociencias Cognitivas del Colegio Universitario de Londres, lleva tiempo investigando el funcionamiento del cerebro. Junto a su equipo encontraron que existe una relación directa entre el número de amigos que una persona tiene en Facebook y el tamaño de ciertas regiones del cerebro, lo que eleva la posibilidad de que el uso de redes sociales pueda cambiar este órgano.
Para llegar a esta conclusión escanearon el cerebro de 125 estudiantes universitarios usuarios de Facebook y compararon los resultados con el tamaño de sus grupos de amigos, tanto en la red como en el mundo real. Entrevistado por La Nacion, explica: “Concluimos que cuantos más amigos tenía una persona en esta red social, mayor era su volumen de materia gris en cuatro regiones del cerebro, entre ellas la amígdala, asociada a la respuesta emocional y la memoria, así como otras zonas clave para identificar las señales que se producen durante la comunicación con otras personas”.
El espesor de la materia gris en la amígdala también se vinculó con el número de amigos que tenía la gente en el mundo real, pero el tamaño de las otras tres regiones parecía estar correlacionado sólo con las conexiones online.

“Creo que la razón por la cual se encontró dicha correlación entre el número de amigos de Facebook y lo que sucede en varias regiones del cerebro tiene que ver con el impacto de la actividad social online de las personas, que podría reflejar su nivel de sociabilidad general o de extroversión. Las redes sociales son enormemente influyentes, pero todavía conocemos muy poco sobre el impacto que tienen en nuestros cerebros”, reconoce Kanai, y agrega que a pesar de los estudios realizados, hasta ahora no es posible afirmar si tener más contactos en Facebook hace más grandes determinadas partes del cerebro, o si algunas personas están simplemente predispuestas para tener más amigos.

 

Mark Mapstone, de la Universidad del Rochester Medical Center en Rochester, Nueva York, Estados Unidos. Foto: LA NACION
Está claro que las nuevas tecnologías no atrofian el cerebro, como muchos creen. De todos modos, los entrevistados enfatizan que son herramientas para realizar determinadas acciones, y no deben ser utilizadas como un fin en sí mismo.
Al ritmo al que avanzan las tecnologías parece imposible prever cómo funcionará nuestro cerebro en sólo 20 años. “Este órgano tiene una gran capacidad de adaptación. Es mentira que tenemos zonas del cerebro que no se usan. Todo lo que tenemos lo usamos y todo se adapta para una mejor interacción con el mundo”, concluye el Dr. Allegri.

Si bien hay en marcha diversos estudios científicos al respecto, para la Dra. Alba Richaudeau no es posible aún probar científicamente cómo se están dando esos cambios: “Las investigaciones demandan tiempo y los avances tecnológicos avanzan a una velocidad superior. Tenemos la impresión de que Internet impacta en el funcionamiento cerebral, pero todavía no hay resultados concluyentes. Entonces, si bien ya hay ciertos estudios que dan cuenta de cómo el cerebro se está adaptando al nuevo medio, lo cierto es que aún hay mucho por investigar”.

En definitiva, como dice el neuropsicólogo Mark Mapstone, de la Universidad del Rochester Medical Center de Rochester, Nueva York, Estados Unidos, al ser consultado por La Nacion: “El hombre se ha centrado en la tecnología desde los albores de los tiempos. Controlar el fuego, inventar la rueda y desarrollar el lenguaje escrito son sólo algunos ejemplos de lo que ha sido la evolución. Los humanos somos animales de adaptación, y en este contexto utilizamos la tecnología para que la especie continúe avanzando”.